Statistics

Asthma

  • Asthma prevalence increased from 7.3% in 2001 to 8.6% in 2011, when 25.9 million persons had asthma.1 Females have higher asthma prevalence than males (9.9% compared with 6.2%)2

    • 18.7 million adults aged 18 and over2
    • 6.8 million children aged 0–17 years3
  • Adults of multiple races have the highest asthma prevalence (14.5%)2

  • 14.2 million physician office visits4 ; 1.3 million outpatient visits5; and 1.8 million emergency department visits for asthma6

  • Number of deaths per year: 3,4047  Number of hospital discharges with asthma as first-listed diagnosis: 439,0009

    • 34% higher among females than males8  
    • 75% higher for black persons than white persons8
    • 6.3 times higher for adults (over 18) than children8
  • Average length of hospital stay: 3.6 days9

  • 10.5 million school days and 14.2 million work days missed by people who experienced at least one asthma attack during the year8

  • $56 million in healthcare costs and lost productivity10

  • 3 in 5 people with asthma limit their physical activity11

  • 1 in 5 children with asthma went to an emergency department for asthma-related care in 200911

Environmental Allergies

  • 7.5 percent (17.6 million) of adults over age 18 in the U.S. have hay fever (respiratory allergies)2

  • 9 percent (6.6 million) of children in the U.S. have hay fever3

  • 12.0 percent of children in the U.S. have skin allergies3

Food Allergy

  • Approximately 4.1 million US children under age 18 have food allergies3

  • In 2007, 29% of children who had a food allergy also had asthma12

  • Eight types of food account for 90% of all food allergies: cow’s milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, soybeans, and wheat12

  • 16% of children with food allergies have had allergic reactions to accidental ingestion of food allergens while in school13

  • 25% of anaphylaxis reactions in schools occur among students without previous food allergy diagnosis14

  • Food allergies account for 30% of all cases of anaphylaxis15

  • Food allergies account for 150-200 fatalities per year16

  • Fatal food anaphylaxis is most often caused by peanut (50-62%) and tree nuts (15-30%)17

Insect Sting Allergy

  • 40 people die each year as a result of insect stings18

  • Life- threatening reactions to insect stings occur in 0.4% – 0.8% of children and 3% of adults18

Latex Allergy

  • 8-12% of healthcare workers have latex allergy19

  • 1-6% of the general public have latex allergy19

Drug Allergy

  • Anaphylactic reactions to penicillin cause 400 deaths20

  • Penicillin is the most common cause of drug induced anaphylaxis15

 

  1. Summary Health Statistics for the U.S. Population: National Health Interview Survey, 2011; National Center for Health Statistics data brief Series 10, Number 255; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;

  2. Summary Health Statistics for U.S. Adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2012; National Center for Health Statistics data brief Series 10, Number 260; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;

  3. Summary Health Statistics for U.S. Children: National Health Interview Survey, 2012; National Center for Health Statistics data brief Series 10, Number 258; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  4. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS): 2010 Summary Tables, table 13; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  5. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS): 2010 Outpatient Department Summary Tables, table 11; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  6. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS): 2010 Emergency Department Summary Tables, table 12; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  7. Deaths: Final Data for 2010, tables 10, 11; National Vital Statistics Reports, Vol. 61, No. 4; May 8, 2013; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  8. National Surveillance of Asthma: United States, 2001-2010, Vital and Health Statistics, Series 3, Number 35, November 2012, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  9. National Hospital Discharge Survey: 2010 table, Average length of stay and days of care; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  10. Asthma Facts–CDC’s National Asthma Control Program Grantees; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2013

  11. Asthma’s Impact on the Nation, 9/23/2013; National Asthma Control Program, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  12. Branum AM, Lukacs SL; Food allergy among U.S. children: Trends in prevalence and hospitalizations; NCHS data brief, No. 10; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2008

  13. Sicherer SH, Furlong TJ, DeSimone J, Sampson HA. The US Peanut and Tree Nut Allergy Registry: characteristics of reactions in schools and day care. Journal of Pediatrics 2001 Apr;138(4):560–565

  14. Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Conover-Walker MK, Wood RA. Food-allergic reactions in schools and preschools. Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine 2001 Jul;155(7):790–795

  15. The diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis practice parameter: 2010 Update J Allergy Clin Immunol. Sept 2010.

  16. Sampson HA. Anaphylaxis and emergency treatment. Pediatrics 2003;111:1601-08

  17. Keet CA, Wood RA. Food allergy and anaphylaxis. Immunol Allergy Clin N Am. 2007;27:193-212

  18. Stinging insect hypersensitivity: A practice parameter update 2011. J Allergy Clin Immunol. Vol 27, No. 4

  19. Latex Allergy: What’s the Problem? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,http://www.cdc.gov/healthcommunication/toolstemplates/entertainmented/tips/latexallergy.html, accessed 9/30/2013.

  20. Neugut AL, Ghatak AT and Miller RL. Anaphylaxis in the United States: An investigation into its epidemiology. Archives of Internal Medicine 61 (1): 15-21. 2001.

UPDATED OCTOBER 1, 2013